Guiding Principles

shaktikiff2

Photo prompt courtesy of Shaktiki Sharma

Beverley was in her retro phase when they married. She wanted to recreate the traditional values of a simpler time. Harold was enchanted. Then one day their laminex and steel dining suite was replaced by an ornate Queen Anne – Beverley had discovered antiques. It was all about timelessness and elegance. Harold adapted.

Next came her organic phase and handmade bowls on a splintery recycled table. Beverley sought sustainability, a natural lifestyle. Harold endured, itching in homespun clothing.

But now he was bewildered. Things were disappearing.

‘Minimalism,’ Beverly explained, studying Harold thoughtfully. ‘If it has no purpose, it goes.’

*****

This story is for Friday Fictioneers, hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields. You can find all the other 100 word stories written in response to this week’s prompt here.

Advertisements

42 thoughts on “Guiding Principles

    • I’m glad you noticed the progression (regression?). And yes, he has perhaps now become unnecessary. But Beverley’s still considering her options in this regard, I believe.Thank you for your comment, Ali.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. So true in a few ways. My friend’s wife has been an antique collector and their house is just full of them. However, she has amazing interior decorating skills and those antiques make the place look absolutely stunning. Their oldest daughter (now working on her second child) is also very skilled at interior decor. Oh, and just for the record, both kept their respective husbands (who were very supportive, I might add). Nice, NICE story, Margaret!

    Like

    • Harold’s besotted, but whatever phase Beverley moves into next, I suspect Harold won’t be around to participate. She’s chucking out superfluous items and Harold’s in her sights. Thank you, Rochelle. Glad you enjoyed it.

      Like

  2. Poor Harold. Neither of them must be young now. She had better consider her options a little harder than usual. She’s going to end up alone in her old age, then poor her. Good writing, Margaret. πŸ™‚ — Suzanne

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s