Sir Robert’s pockets

Sir Robert was a vey important man. Annie would hear muffled conversations from his library, and sometimes shouting voices. Occasionally there were ladies, and tears. 

‘Sir Robert deals with weighty matters,’ explained Mrs Jervis, the housekeeper, when Annie asked. ‘You keep your mind on your job and don’t ask questions that don’t concern you.’

Annie knew her place. Her job was to launder and iron Sir Robert’s shirts and trousers. Annie didn’t complain. Sir Robert’s pockets were deep, and he never checked them properly.

Tucked safely under her mattress, Annie’s growing coin collection was itself becoming quite a weighty matter.

*****

Here is my (very late) 100 word story for this week’s Friday Fictioneers. Thanks to Rochelle for hosting the weekly link-up, and to Valerie J. Barrett for this week’s photo prompt.

28 thoughts on “Sir Robert’s pockets

  1. A good and amusing story, Margaret. Sir Robert was important but also careless and cruel. I can’t see him being generous. I suppose more than one poorly paid servant in those days got some money on the side if possible. —- Suzanne

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    • I bet they did. I’ve been reading a bit of historical fiction recently, and the photo this week fitted right in with where my thoughts were – even though I didn’t think of this story until yesterday. Thank you for your kind comment, Suzanne.

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    • I really wish I could get story ideas more easily – I’m in awe of writers, such as yourself, who post great stories right after the prompt goes up. You should see me in writing workshops when they set an impromptu writing exercise. Blank paper at the start, and blank paper at the end of the time. Embarrassing. Anyway, Annie came through for me with this one – it’s all her doing, I’m sure. Many thanks, Rochelle.

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  2. Serves Sir Robert right, a little revenge on behalf of all the tearful women, and some money saved on the side. Great story, I love it.

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    • You’re right, Jade. She’s struck it lucky in Sir Robert’s house. She’ll keep turning a deaf ear to the shenanigans going on in the library and work away quietly at her laundry duties.

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  3. Pingback: Natural justice | Onto the page

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